Hiroshi Yamamoto

Over at the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, I write up the remarkable authorial career of Hiroshi Yamamoto, who started out as an elf-girl called Deedlit.

“In any other country’s sf community, an author like Yamamoto might have been the darling of the convention circuit for decades, and a regular sight at awards ceremonies. But in Japan, where his prolixity and varied output is notable but unremarkable, Yamamoto had to wait until Kyōnen wa Ii-nen ni Naru Darō [“Last Year Should be a Good Year”] (2010) to receive a Seiun Award for long-form fiction. Intimately involved in the post-911 zeitgeist, it imagines a world, but more pointedly an America, invaded by androids from the 24th century, determined to stop contemporary conflicts and terrorism as part of an operation in a much wider-ranging Changewar, the precise aims and consequences of which are hidden from inhabitants of the present day.”

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Black Mirrors

Over at the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, I contribute entries on the East Asian anthology films inspired by the controversial Ten Years (Hong Kong). Click on the links to find out about a dozen local film-makers’ takes on what the future could be like in Ten Years Japan, Ten Years Taiwan, and Ten Years Thailand.

Big Hitters

Over at the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, I write major new entries on some of the big hitters of anime and manga, including Rumiko Takahashi, the creator of Lum (pictured), Masamune Shirow, creator of Ghost in the Shell, and Tetsu Kariya, creator of Oishinbo. My Chinese and Japanese entries in the encyclopedia now amount to more than 160,000 words — that’s two book-length collections of articles.

Game-Changers

Up now at the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, an entire nest of articles about the women who transformed manga in the 1970s, including large entries on Moto Hagio and Keiko Takemiya, and a general piece on their Year 24 Group. As an additional bonus, there’s also a piece on Sachiko Kashiwaba, the fantasist whose work was infamously proclaimed as an “inspiration” for Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away.